Handmade Christmas Card Planner

When you send handmade holiday cards you are sending a message that the person receiving it is special to you.With just a bit of planning, you can create personalized Christmas cards and a joyful tradition! Take these steps and you’ll be on your way to sending your most heartfelt Christmas cards ever.

Plan & Schedule: August – Mid September

Just A bit of planning will go a long way in making your holiday card project successful and fun. Begin by checking your holiday list and deciding how many cards you are going to send out. Take a minute to determine your budget for materials as well as postage if you will be mailing them. Look at your calendar and decide when you want to send out the cards and also block off time on several evenings or a couple weekend days during which you can work on your cards. Of course the time you set aside will depend on how many cards you are making and how simple or
complex your design is. If you are adding a family photo, you’ll need to schedule a time to get everyone together to have the picture taken.

Pick a Design: Early – Mid September

If you are making just a few cards, then have fun designing any type of card you like. However, if you are making lots of cards, you’ll find the experience much faster if you have a design with fewer layers and intricate details. Using Designer Series Paper as a layer can add fast and easy detail to your cards. The Rhinestone or Pearl Jewels are beautiful, affordable, and speedy accents that will dress up your designs without adding a lot of bulk or effort. The Idea Book & Catalog and the gorgeous new Holiday Mini are wonderful resources since they are packed full of samples and ideas. Don’t forget to visit my website as I’m updating it often with seasonal inspiration.

Order Supplies: September – Early October

Once you’ve designed your card(s) and know how many cards you want to make, you can figure out what stamp sets and inks you will need. You can also calculate the amount of card stock, Designer Series Paper, embellishments, envelopes, and adhesive you will need. If you need help, just let me know.

Cut & Assemble: October-November

Create an assembly line system. Start by cutting card bases and layers so they are ready to go. Plan a get-together with friends where you can all chat and work on holiday cards together. Time will fly when you have some festive music, tasty seasonal snacks, and friends to make a merry atmosphere. Or sit down and create your cards with your family. Even young kids can help add adhesive, punch out shapes, color in stamped images or stuff envelopes. Consider a temporary storage option like our Stampin’ Card Keeper to hold your un-assembled pieces so you can put them away and start again easily. If your kitchen table is your craft area, having a storage option ready will help to make a smooth transition
when it’s time for dinner.

Mail: Early December

Avoid the lines and rush at the post office by mailing your cards in early December. You’ll enjoy a great sense of accomplishment when you check-off your to-do list early. Plus, you’ll have more time in December to relax and appreciate the special moments and activities of the season. Don’t forget to decorate the envelopes to surprise and delight your recipient.

Share the Joy

When you send handmade cards, you are sending a personal expression of love and thoughtfulness that will be warmly received and appreciated. If you have questions about making your holiday cards, please let me know – I am always here to help you!

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One response to this post.

  1. Great advice and I love your card!

    Reply

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